Infinite Summer

Formed in the summer of 2009 to read David Foster Wallace's masterwork "Infinite Jest".
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The Inficratic Oath: first, post no spoilers. Limit your I.J. discussion to only those events that take place on or before the page 981 (100%).



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 Post subject: Re: yrstruly and poor tony
PostPosted: Sun Jul 05, 2009 12:01 pm 
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Posts: 11
On page 133 he uses the term "cheeseater' which seems more comprehendible as a rat or a snitch than when he just uses "cheese" by itself as in the last passage of this section when Poor Tony goes on to greener pastures and eats cheese. Does he become a paid snitch for the police? As far as "maps" go, I think we've established it means face but I wondered if DFW coined it from another Irish expression ( I hope I'm not getting tiresome on this ) "She had the map of Ireland written all over her face"- of course meaning she was freckle-faced, blue-eyed,fair skinned - generally Irish looking. Always meant as a compliment. Wallace is a very Scottish name but since there was a huge Scottish presence in Ireland (Scotch-Irish) I wonder if DFW is descended from this tradition and that's why these Irish based phrases keep showing up in his book. Perhaps I should take the time to read his biography. :-)


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 Post subject: Re: yrstruly and poor tony
PostPosted: Sun Jul 05, 2009 4:06 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 21, 2009 5:21 pm
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Location: Philadelphia, PA
just a note, for those who might not have noticed.... roy tony and the brighton projects are mentioned by yrstruly on p. 129; these are both mentioned in the wardine section. are there any other connections between those two sections that i might be missing?


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 Post subject: Re: yrstruly and poor tony
PostPosted: Mon Jul 06, 2009 9:55 am 
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Location: Orlando, FL
elisabeth wrote:
just a note, for those who might not have noticed.... roy tony and the brighton projects are mentioned by yrstruly on p. 129; these are both mentioned in the wardine section. are there any other connections between those two sections that i might be missing?


I felt a connection between this section and the Wardine section too and here's my additional thought - is C in this section Clenette? I may be completely off base on this but that was the gut reaction I had. Anyone else? Ok, I went back and re-read and have to edit this now - they are definitely not the same person, but I still think there are definite resonances between the sections.

Joan


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 Post subject: Re: yrstruly and poor tony
PostPosted: Tue Jul 07, 2009 6:44 am 
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I really loathe this part of the book. This is where I stopped my first-time around. I can understand what's happening and what the author is doing cerebrally, and when I'm removed from it I think 'huh, that's cool in a way,' but when I get into it I cannot stand that section. This time I pushed through and am relieved that I did (I just finished it, I was ahead of schedule before yrstrly). Mostly I'm glad its over (for now) and I'm thoroughly enjoying the rest of the book.


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 Post subject: Re: yrstruly and poor tony
PostPosted: Tue Jul 07, 2009 9:40 am 
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joel wrote:
I feel like this section, considering the use of a heavily dialectal voice and made-up slang ("eating cheese," "crewing") to describe scenes of violence and theft, is definitely inspired by A Clockwork Orange.


I felt the same way when reading this section. I think that's why I enjoyed it while to others it was another "how many more pages of this?" section. Another hint that I noticed, the narrator in A Clockwork Orange refers to himself as "Your Humble Narrator". I thought "yrstruly" was a play on that.


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 Post subject: Re: yrstruly and poor tony
PostPosted: Tue Jul 07, 2009 1:58 pm 
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Location: Shippensburg, Pa
1.0 wrote:
For me pages 128-135 were one of those leap of faith sections that you had to plow through as a reader.


Yeah I had to read this section over two times just to get it in my head right. I can assume that this one one of those speed bumps where some people bail out.

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 Post subject: Re: yrstruly and poor tony
PostPosted: Tue Jul 07, 2009 2:29 pm 
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I would encourage those who find this section grating to re-read the mainlining Draino huddled over a vent description (toward the end). Again, personally, I found that to "make up" for any annoyance I may have experienced with the language choice (which I didn't feel too much of [annoyance] relative to some of you). Absolutely chilling description of addiction-addled destitution, I thought - such a naked, harsh reality.


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 Post subject: Re: yrstruly and poor tony
PostPosted: Tue Jul 07, 2009 11:39 pm 
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What is the origin for "map" being slang for face? The explanation I can come up with is that a face is a guide to the person - and a map is a guide. But it is the most non-visceral, romantic sounding, least tough slang I've ever heard. It is like a poet's slang, in which case isn't that a metaphor?


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 Post subject: Re: yrstruly and poor tony
PostPosted: Wed Jul 08, 2009 1:11 am 
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Posts: 63
Location: Fresyes, CA
ruinedmap wrote:
What is the origin for "map" being slang for face?

Being a word nut, I have tried to hunt down the origin of the usage of "map" for "face," but all I can find is that it's sort of old-timey gangster talk. It's used in Raymond Chandler mysteries. This doesn't mean that the usage originated in the 1940s, though, and we don't know where it started. As for why...I've heard the expression "his face is like a map of the world" or "his face has a map of the world written on it" to mean that someone is wise-looking or looks like they have been through a lot.

(Potentially fun fact: "Her face is a map of the world" is the first line of the song "Suddenly" by KT Tunstall. I like KT Tunstall because she's from Scotland and plays a Gretsch guitar. Anyway. Map.)


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 Post subject: Re: yrstruly and poor tony
PostPosted: Tue Jul 28, 2009 2:21 pm 
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Sorry about the long bump, but I'd just finished this section (re-reading, that is, so I'm not following the I.S. schedule or worrying about spoilers). God, that draino-laced fix scene is fucking chilling. I literally felt sick reading that.

ruinedmap wrote:
What is the origin for "map" being slang for face? The explanation I can come up with is that a face is a guide to the person - and a map is a guide. But it is the most non-visceral, romantic sounding, least tough slang I've ever heard. It is like a poet's slang, in which case isn't that a metaphor?


I'd heard it before IJ, too, and curiosity got the better of me, so I checked OED. The first example there is from 1899, A.H. Lewis' Sandburrs. There are a couple of Wodehouse quotes, too, and -- get this -- the last usage citation: "1996 D. F. WALLACE Infinite Jest 280 That look on your map there mean something there, Randy?".

Ran a quick advanced search under 'quotation author', and he's already a cited source for 46 definitions. Awesome.


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